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With its strong association to the holidays, homemade eggnog was a holiday tradition growing up. I always had a strong affinity for the wintery drink despite it being quite an acquired taste. Despite the hefty price tag at the store, this festive drink is fairly easy to make. Eggnog is best made the night before or early in the morning to give it enough time to chill.

Ingredients:

  • 12 large eggs, separated
  • 1 ½ c. sugar
  • 6 c. whole milk
  • 2 c. heavy cream
  • 1 Tbps. vanilla extract
  • 2 tsp. ground nutmeg
  • 2 c. bourbon or 1½ c. bourbon & ½ c. rum (optional)

Directions:

Separate yolks and whites.

Separate yolks and whites.

Separate eggs. Set aside egg whites.

Mix yolks and sugar until pale yellow.

Mix yolks and sugar until pale yellow.

In a bowl large, whisk together egg yolks and granulated sugar until thick and pale yellow. Set aside.

Add milk, cream, vanilla to pot.

Add milk, cream, vanilla to pot.

Combine milk, heavy cream and vanilla in a large pot. Slowly heat over medium heat until hot and just about to simmer.

Stir quickly to temper the mixture.

Stir quickly to temper the mixture.

Slowly pour the hot milk mixture into egg yolk mixture. Stir continuously to temper.*

The mixture will lose the white foam when it begins to thicken, then will coat a metal spoon when done.

The mixture will lose the white foam when it begins to thicken, then will coat a metal spoon when done.

Pour mixture back into pot. Heat over medium heat, stirring constantly—about 18-20 minutes. Mixture will thicken and coat a metal spoon. Do not allow mixture to boil or it will curdle.

Mix in nutmeg.

Mix in nutmeg.

Remove from heat. Stir in nutmeg. Cover and chill for 8 hours. Sticking the mixture in a freezer will speed along the process, but must be stirred frequently.

Beat until stiff peaks form.

Beat until stiff peaks form.

Once mixture is chilled, beat egg whites until stiff peaks form. Fold egg whites into mixture. If desired, stir in bourbon/rum.

Before serving, sprinkle top with nutmeg.

Tips:

  • *Tempering the milk and egg yolk mixture prevents the eggs from cooking in the hot milk.
  • Did the egg and milk mixture begin curdling? Try vigorously whisking the mixture until smooth again.
  • When beating egg whites, make sure they’re room temperature and add ¼ tsp. salt or cream of tartar to stabilize whites.
  • If not adding the alcohol, eggnog may seem thick, but usually deflates with time. Because of this, I prefer to make mine the night before as I feel it always tastes better the following day.
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Growing up, buttermilk was the weird, thick milk beloved by my dad whom would trick me into taking drinks. Despite my father’s love for it, it’s something I would never normally keep in my fridge—until now. Too often, a recipe has required buttermilk and (unfortunately) a stick of butter in a glass of milk does not make a suitable substitute. Buttermilk comes in two forms—traditional and cultured. Traditional buttermilk is the liquid left after butter making and can be very pricey. Luckily, cultured buttermilk is incredibly cheap and simple to make.

You will need (could this be any simpler?):

  • Jar with lid
  • Milk
  • Cultured buttermilk

Let’s Get Started

Pour some buttermilk into an empty jar—I’m never specific with measurements, but a 1:3 ratio is safe to follow. I like to use mason jars because the lid won’t “pop” when pressed if the mixture is culturing correctly.

Fill the rest of the jar up with milk.

Shake, shake, shake.

Put the lid on the jar and shake to evenly distribute the buttermilk bacteria throughout the milk.

The waiting game.

Let the mixture sit on the counter for approximately 24 hours. After a day, the mixture will be cultured and should stick to the side of the jar. Take a whiff, it should smell slightly sour.

Cultured buttermilk sticks to the side of the jar.

Make some up ahead of time and keep it in the refrigerator for the next time you have a hankerin’ for some fried chicken or buttermilk pancakes.

Buttermilk Pancakes – Delicious!

Interested in making traditional buttermilk? Try reading Alli Cobra’s Butter-making for the Adventurous.

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When I was a little girl, my dad would share stories of the yogurt his grandmother made in a jar without modern simplicities. Yogurt is still a refrigerator staple for my father, but the cost of buying it can quickly eat away at the thrifty shopper’s wallet. Making yogurt is not only a fraction of the cost, but is one of the few old traditions that can be made simple.

What is needed?

  • Milk
  • Yogurt or freeze dried yogurt starter
  • Pot
  • Candy thermometer
  • Containers or jars
  • Whisk
  • Spoon
  • Powdered milk (optional)

Heat the Milk

Heat the milk to 185ºF (85ºC). Stir frequently to prevent the milk from scorching on the bottom of pot. As the milk cools, powdered milk may be added (optional). The addition of powdered milk will create a richer, thicker yogurt.

Let milk cool to 100ºF-120ºF (38ºC-49ºC).

Add Yogurt Starter

Add the yogurt starter to the cooled milk. I typically add approximately 2 tablespoons per pint of milk. Whisk the yogurt starter into the milk to evenly distribute the bacteria. I am using a favorite yogurt brand; however, they do sell freeze-dried yogurt starters. If using premade yogurt for a starter, try to choose a brand you prefer as they all have different tastes. The yogurt must contain live active cultures and should not have any added flavors.

Distribute Mixture

Distribute mixture into containers—I prefer mason jars to keep water out.

Keep the Mixture Warm (100ºF-120ºF/38ºC-49ºC)

Place the containers into a cooler filled halfway with hot water (100ºF-120ºF/38ºC-49ºC). Don’t have a cooler? An electric yogurt maker, a preheated crock pot wrapped in towels, or sunny window sill work as well.

The Waiting Game

Let sit for 6-12 hours, or overnight. I prefer to leave mine overnight, but I recommend rechecking the temperature of the water-filled cooler to make sure the proper heat is being maintained.

Fresh cultured yogurt.

Prefer Greek Yogurt?

Strain the yogurt in cheesecloth until desired consistency is achieved. Alternatively, use a white kitchen rag or towel. Whey will drain from the yogurt as it thickens.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Want to make Yogurt Cheese? 

Yogurt cheese is a healthier alternative to cream cheese and is very easy to make. Simply strain yogurt through cheesecloth overnight until the yogurt is thick and spreadable.

Tips

  • If yogurt doesn’t turn out and temperatures were correct throughout, try switching brands. I went through two brands before I found one that cultured correctly.
  • Save a little yogurt to use as a starter for the next batch.
  • Honey drizzled over Greek yogurt.

    Add any flavor to taste: jam, honey and maple syrup all work well.

  • Save leftover whey from strained yogurt to boost the health of tomato plants.
  • Whey is a healthy addition to any diet.

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